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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi new to the forums, been reading peoples post for the last week. Looking to order My DS HSE this week and was wondering users views on Paint protection (diamond Bright). Is it worth it, and how much did people pay.
 

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Welcome D888, if you scroll through the topics you will see quite a lengthy post on this subject. Most seem to think it is overpriced and you are better off doing it yourself. I had Auto glym lifeshine applied by the dealer and I am delighted with it. Very little stick to the paintwork (flys etc) and what does is easily wiped off. Rain forms droplets and runs off the windscreen and the protection on the ivory leather makes cleaning easy. I wouldn't have done it myself and was happy to pay the cost.
 

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D888 said:
Hi new to the forums, been reading peoples post for the last week. Looking to order My DS HSE this week and was wondering users views on Paint protection (diamond Bright). Is it worth it, and how much did people pay.
If you are going to do this then consider GTechniq - I have no affiliation at all, however, have 2 of my previous cars protected by their system, one of which was done 18months ago and still droplets water like the day it was done. There is lots of anecdotal evidence to suggest that its all about product application and that many dealer fit systems are not put on with much love and care as the product is applied by their in-house valeters in a suasage machine like way at a fixed cost, rather than a bespoke detailer.

I would suggest you research thoroughly the merits of your protection system. by the time the car has left the factory, been water tested, tranbsport, "valeted" round the back of the delaer etc there will be alot of paint defects |(swirls etc) that need to be correctefd before a protection system is applied, else the defects (especially of dark colours) will be accentuated. A little extra upfront to correct the factory paint to a mirror finish by a proper detailer before application (irrespective of what system you choose) will bear alot of fruit if you intend to keep the car for a while.
 

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I changed my car coating from Swisstec to Williams Ceramic Coating as it guarantees the paint to be protected from acid bird droppings for 3 weeks. As bird droppings damaged my RR Evoque in Barolo Black, this is the reason I want to try Williams. I don't believe in one perfect product but having done my research this one simply gave me a gokd vibe

I paid gbp 275 for the exterior treatment with

Website:
http://www.autoprotect.co.uk/ceramic-coat

Ceramic Coat protects your customer's vehicle's paintwork, alloys, bumpers, glass (except front and rear screens) even interior surfaces and fabrics. They are all shielded. Ceramic Coat is guaranteed for the lifetime of their vehicle ownership*and the vehicle will never have to be polished again.

Ceramic Coat bonds with the pores in the paintwork to form an extremely durable, crystal clear finish that needs no maintenance except washing.
It resists UV light, cold, frost, acid rain, exhaust fumes, bird lime (provided it is removed within 21 days) and solvents.
It has shown in tests to afford more protection than any similar product.
It saves time, money and elbow-grease!
 
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I have had more new cars than I can remember and for most I merely polished them two or three times immediately from new. That offers a good deal of protection.

I had Scotchguard on a Citroen C5 Tourer - not impressed and bird droppings burnt the paint within hours - even to the extent that washed off at say 09:00 having appeared overnight, there was a distinct trace left. I contacted Citroen who - in their usual fashion - didn't want to know.

I had a similar treatment on my last car - a Kia Sportage - which did seem much better but a very expensive choice as I only kept the car nine months . On my DS I haven't bothered, preferring to revert to my tried and tested few coats of decent wax polish from the start. Much less expensive and just as effective.
 

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I had birdlime affect a previous car.. It had protection on it but still did something weird.. but because it had protection meant that it had to be dealt with under that product warranty and resort the paintwork as it didn't protect. I've seen other damage from birds and recently, a 911 seems to have had some lacquer affected and when it was washed, it lifted the lacquer.
 

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Land Rover used to in the old days (1980/90's) and i suspect before, had contain within the specifications for paint finish a test for acid resistance.
This at the time to my knowledge was the only car manufacture to have a acid test within the paint specification, and i was told this was because the vehicles had to be capable of driving through farmyards, which were likely to contained cow muck and the likes, this as with bird poo are acidic.
 

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I doubt it is still in force but the title is "Determination of the resistance of paint films to Acid Spotting" RES.30.PA.065. :ugeek: that's something to throw at the dealers if you have any issues. :D
 

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The only person making out of this is the salesman, like one of the other replies, l have had more new land rovers than l care to mention, because of this l have about 6 or 7 polish kits in my garage, did l pay, no, got them thrown in, would l pay? not a chance in hell, just look after your car, wash it, and give it some polish if you want, but modern day paints don't need it. Save your money and take your partner out for a good meal, sit in the window with your car parked out front and enjoy the view, and by the way don't forget to talk to your partner....
 
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Moose said:
I doubt it is still in force but the title is "Determination of the resistance of paint films to Acid Spotting" RES.30.PA.065. :ugeek: that's something to throw at the dealers if you have any issues. :D
Sale of Goods Act would also be useful in an extreme case I suspect
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the replies, ordered my car today :p without paint protection. Have till October to do some research :)
 

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I've had previous LRs Supragarded and Protect & Care(d) and in all honesty think it was a waste of money. Just a bucket and sponge once a week using a good wash 'n wax is just as good (and a leather of course) is now what our DS's get
 

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merctony said:
The only person making out of this is the salesman, like one of the other replies, l have had more new land rovers than l care to mention, because of this l have about 6 or 7 polish kits in my garage, did l pay, no, got them thrown in, would l pay? not a chance in hell, just look after your car, wash it, and give it some polish if you want, but modern day paints don't need it. Save your money and take your partner out for a good meal, sit in the window with your car parked out front and enjoy the view, and by the way don't forget to talk to your partner....
True modern water based paints do not need the old fashioning waxing anymore, however, the protection is all about protecting the laquer. This is generally the bit that gets damaged in car washes, bird splats etc and is the bit that is always corrected during paint correction by detailers. Some manufacturers put ceramics in their laquer to make them harder (such as Mercedes) in a bid to resist swirling etc - in reality it doesn't work and makes them a real t*** to try and polish out scratches - even with a machine.

Landrover paint laquer generally sits in the middle range of hardness which means they will swirl and scratch fairly easily. When I sold my RRE a couple of months ago I used my DA machine to polish out loads of scratches (Santonorini Black) that would have been impossible to remove so quickly on my wifes Mercedes. Modern protection systems work by that marvel of modern times Nano Technology. They chemically bond to the surface and act a 5 to 10 micron layer on top of the laquer (car should leave the factory with about 120 to 200 micron) to inhibit swirl marks etc. However, by doing this they often enhance the gloss of the paintwork , hence why a detailer should correct the paint before it is applied.

I was sceptical about most of this stuff but "experimented" on my wifes Black Merc because I wanted something that would work before we bought our last RRE. I had previously had a black FL2 and after 2.5 years I have never had a car look in such bad shape after regular washing by a mixture of automatic and jet wash type washing (no chhoice out here in Germany i'm afraid) and didn't want my RRE to suffer the same. A couple of work colleagues thought the Merc had been resprayed once I had corrected and applied the GTechniq stuff myself and they used the system to do their cars with equally good results. Also it means when I wash the car water beads off as I am washing it and dirt floats off really quickly. The system made a massive difference on my RRE and the only scratches after 2 years that needed removal were self inflicted. I am convinced such technology works but as with anything you get what you pay for. A detailer would correct and then apply a full protection system in and out for about £500 that will last many many years. There is a whole load of stuff out their on YouTube about how they do this which would be worth a read - especially some of those videos about correcting the paint on new cars.
 
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It seems from reading many of the above that it's car wash machines which are causing the problem. I haven't used one of those for 30 years or more but manually wash and leather the car weekly.

I use the soft long broom I use to wash my caravan and can wash two cars in under 10 minutes plus leathering after I sweep off the excess water with a soft squeegy type nylon device. I do the wheels with a sponge or soft brush.

Each to his own, and I sure some people have lives so busy they feel they have to use a machine (so I do I but always find time to wash my own car), but it always amazes me when I pass the massive queue for the hand car washes run by Polish guys here in Norwich. I can hose or pressure wash - I live in the middle of nowhere and mud gets an inch thick on the car's underside in winter - wash, rinse and dry TWO cars in less time than it takes them to wait in the queue.

Can never understand why anyone would pay for a car wash to be honest and I bet I do a better job of it, with less risk to the paintwork than any machine.
 

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Beast said:
It seems from reading many of the above that it's car wash machines which are causing the problem. I haven't used one of those for 30 years or more but manually wash and leather the car weekly.

I use the soft long broom I use to wash my caravan and can wash two cars in under 10 minutes plus leathering after I sweep off the excess with a soft squeegy type nylon device. I do the wheels with a sponge or soft brush.

Each to his own, and I sure some people have lives so busy they feel they have to use a machine (so I do I but always find time to wash my own car), but it always amazes me when I pass the massive queue for the hand car washes run by Polish guys here in Norwich. I can hose or pressure wash - I live in the middle of nowhere and mud gets an inch thick on the car's underside in winter - wash, rinse and dry TWO cars in less time than it takes them to wait in the queue.

Can never understand why anyone would pay for a car wash to be honest and I bet I do a better job of it, with less risk to the paintwork than any machine.
With you on this, as you say each to their own, I always have washed the car at home and do not use any pressure washer to do it (at least not on my cars, the company car is a different matter)
 
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Moose said:
Beast said:
It seems from reading many of the above that it's car wash machines which are causing the problem. I haven't used one of those for 30 years or more but manually wash and leather the car weekly.

I use the soft long broom I use to wash my caravan and can wash two cars in under 10 minutes plus leathering after I sweep off the excess with a soft squeegy type nylon device. I do the wheels with a sponge or soft brush.

Each to his own, and I sure some people have lives so busy they feel they have to use a machine (so I do I but always find time to wash my own car), but it always amazes me when I pass the massive queue for the hand car washes run by Polish guys here in Norwich. I can hose or pressure wash - I live in the middle of nowhere and mud gets an inch thick on the car's underside in winter - wash, rinse and dry TWO cars in less time than it takes them to wait in the queue.

Can never understand why anyone would pay for a car wash to be honest and I bet I do a better job of it, with less risk to the paintwork than any machine.
With you on this, as you say each to their own, I always have washed the car at home and do not use any pressure washer to do it (at least not on my cars, the company car is a different matter)
I never find the slightest problem with a pressure washer to be honest - in fact it's pretty essential where I live in winter and you would do more damage trying to scrape the mud off by brush than using the PW - as long as you don't go silly and apply it an inch from the paintwork they are brilliant and highly efffective
 

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Beast said:
Moose said:
Beast said:
It seems from reading many of the above that it's car wash machines which are causing the problem. I haven't used one of those for 30 years or more but manually wash and leather the car weekly.

I use the soft long broom I use to wash my caravan and can wash two cars in under 10 minutes plus leathering after I sweep off the excess with a soft squeegy type nylon device.
+1

Soft long broom like I use on my caravan - aaahhh!

soft squeegy type nylon devi ce - aahhh!

Find the right handwasher (like where I was in Nottinghmam recently) where they use nothing but sponges and micro-fibre cloths to dry and there will be far less damage than a broom and a squeegy.
 
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I suspect a case of OCD here - see your therapist immediately! :twisted:

I have never, ever had the slightest problem using either, over many cars and many years. I would never pay a handwasher - absolute waste of money to my mind, but I appreciate others see that differently. With all due respect, I see them all queuing up on a Sunday morning and I think "What a bunch of lazy ********" !
 
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