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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We did see some prototype remarks in the press when the Jaguar XE was launched many months ago yet now the first production tests appear of the new 2.0 Ingenium Diesel engine. While Jaguar, Evoque and Discovery Sport all receive the same engines, it is worth reading:

http://www.motoringresearch.com/car-reviews/jaguar-xe-2-0d-180-review-2015-first-drive-0423972687

The Jaguar XE should be the car that strikes fear into the 3 Series. And if there's one variant that BMW should be particularly anxious about, it's this one: the high-volume 2.0-litre turbodiesel, in optimum 180hp guise. For if Jaguar gets this one right, BMW really has got a fight on its hands. Game on, then.

What's the Jaguar XE 2.0d 180 like to drive?

The engine first: with the prototype, we were worried that, while smooth, it was maybe a bit too vocal and gruff. It's cured here: apart from a bit of tickover shimmy, the all-new engine is very refined and easily a match for the new 2.0-litre diesel in the BMW; as such, it also topples Audi's 2.0-litre TDI and the clattery, aged 2.1-litre Bluetec in the Mercedes-Benz. It revs particularly sweetly, with little diesel drone, and step-on response to the accelerator is both swift and smooth. We're pleased to report how cultured and sweet it is.

It's quick, posting 0-62mph in 7.4 seconds, and 317lb ft of torque gives it guts. It blends particularly well with the smooth, satisfying eight-speed auto option, but also works nicely with the six-speed manual, the same ZF gearbox as used by BMW. With a meaty clutch, positive action and mechanical feel, the stubby lever's action will please the enthusiasts.


Does the Jaguar XE 2.0d 180 beat the BMW 320d?

The diesel engine is, to our relief, thoroughly on the money, which it had to be given the improvements BMW's found in its new generation 2.0-litre 190hp unit. Again, both are clear of the competition here (Mercedes-Benz needs to take a serious look at that oil-burner of its, and soon).
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
http://www.fleetnews.co.uk/cars/reviews/first-drive-jaguar-xe-20d-180-se-manual-car-review

Now, finally, we have the launch proper. Well, almost - there was still no 2.0-litre 163hp 99g/km Ingenium diesel to drive, despite that model being a major attraction for fleets when the XE is available in June.

Instead, we were provided with the more powerful 180hp diesel which, at 109g/km (auto and manual are the same), sits two BIK bands higher and returns 67.3mpg. Jaguar believes fleet drivers will be split between the two engines, weighted 60-40 in favour of the 99g/km, 75mpg option.

(another indication that in reality to lower powered 2.0 diesel uses 10% less fuel as also confirmed in the RR Evoque spec)

On efficiency, it is the clear market leader: the official combined figures tell their own story, but Jaguar executives claim real-world driving by their own staff has seen the 163hp diesel up above 70mpg mark.

To drive, the diesel is responsive and refined: it's eager to push on and is suited to the eight-speed automatic gearbox that is a hand-me-down from the XF.

Service intervals are 21,000 while two five-year service packs are available, both including AdBlue top ups: a 50,000-mile plan at £475 and a 75,000-mile plan at £659. Jaguar expects a high take-up from fleets, particularly as the plans are transferrable to the next owner so are likely to be rewarded by a higher residual value.


Latter comment is interesting for those interested in service plan; lets see if DS will get a similar choice
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/jaguar/xe/first-drives/2015-jaguar-xe-review

What's it like?:

Every bit the contender that it needs to be. We've tried the higher-powered diesel with a manual gearbox and an auto, and sampled it with all three suspension set-ups - Comfort, Sport and Adaptive (active dampers).

First, the diesel engine. When we tried the late prototype earlier this year, even Jag admitted that the four-cylinder Ingenium motor still had a fair amount of metallic twang to its note. Not any more. The engine is perhaps no quieter overall than the 320d's lump, but its tone is smoother and notably more refined.

Either way, the diesel is flat at around 1500rpm but picks up north of 1750rpm and is happy to rev to 4000rpm without emitting a harsh tone. It settles down to a distant rumble at motorway speeds, too; you're far more likely to be bothered by wind noise from the door mirrors, and road roar.
 
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