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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

We've got 2 under 2 and we need something with more space. Have shortlisted to a used Q7, Disco Sport or an Xtrail.

It will be used for me commuting to the office once a week about 60 miles and then for trips around town etc. We will in a rural area so ideally need a 4x4 our Juke isn't up to the hills here. Will be anywhere between 6000-10,000 miles a year.

I've read various issues about the DPF, so can anyone reassure me? This is the one I am looking at Check out this Land Rover Discovery Sport that I have just found on #motorscouk
 

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If your only doing mainly short journeys then you should really consider a petrol version.
 

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There are more diesels than petrol models available pre-MY20 so I guess that'll have some baring on pricing. It isn't advisable to have any diesel vehicle if your only doing short trips. You'll get DPF issues on anything if the vehicle isn't regenerating regulally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There are more diesels than petrol models available pre-MY20 so I guess that'll have some baring on pricing. It isn't advisable to have any diesel vehicle if your only doing short trips. You'll get DPF issues on anything if the vehicle isn't regenerating regulally.
Thanks appreciate the reply. Will Sheffield > Leeds be enough weekly?
 

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I can't really answer that. Yes it might be absolutely fine, I've not had any issues myself. Maybe some others on here can post their experiences. If you are able to look at the car's history, you might be able to see if ut's had any DPF issues as well as anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can't really answer that. Yes it might be absolutely fine, I've not had any issues myself. Maybe some others on here can post their experiences. If you are able to look at the car's history, you might be able to see if ut's had any DPF issues as well as anything else.
the dealer said the DPF pipe was replaced at 29,000 miles. I'm not sure if thats a good or bad thing!
 

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I bought a petrol one to avoid DPF issues, before that had the original 2.2L.🤨
 

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Thanks appreciate the reply. Will Sheffield > Leeds be enough weekly?
If the journey co-insides with the cars wish to have an active regeneration then the hour it would take from Sheffield to Leeds is easily long enough - it takes less than 20 minutes.
Problem is the car doesn't know that this is the day you are going to do a long run, or that your long journey is going to finish in 5 minutes. Once it fails a regen it waits a specific amount of miles (200?) before it attempts it again, possibly to prevent oil dilution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If the journey co-insides with the cars wish to have an active regeneration then the hour it would take from Sheffield to Leeds is easily long enough - it takes less than 20 minutes.
Problem is the car doesn't know that this is the day you are going to do a long run, or that your long journey is going to finish in 5 minutes. Once it fails a regen it waits a specific amount of miles (200?) before it attempts it again, possibly to prevent oil dilution.
Thanks Andy, and what happens during this wait time?
 

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The DPF continues to fill with soot !
Do this several times without a successful regeneration and it's time for a visit to the dealership so that they can force the car to regenerate using diagnostics.

Mine is a late 2018 (MY2019 ?) and it will do a regeneration when stuck in stop/start traffic. I have an OBD diagnostics tool plugged in most of the time so can monitor the DPF status, driving to work one morning, drove the 2-3 miles to the dual carriageway to be confronted with nose to tail stop/start traffic, so the next 2-3 miles took over half an hour on tickover - don't you love autos in heavy traffic :)
Anyway towards the end of the crawl I noticed that the DPF had gone from 100% full to 15%. So speed is not an issue, time is.
Its 40 miles to work, over 30 of those are on free flowing motorways, so the car had decided the the previous journey at motorway speeds wasn't the right time to regenerate !!!

If the vast majority of journeys are just a few minutes you should really go for petrol - around town they use the same amount of fuel and diesels take far longer to warm up - this is not restricted to LR.

Lots of low mileage journeys? Forget 21,000 miles and two years between services, think 10,000 or even 7,000 miles and never more than a year between services.
 
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My 2019 does 90% local runs. I ensure it gets an annual oil change and accept that it will clock up a fair few regen fails.
But, I've had no problems with the DPF - not even a warning.
A run between Leeds and Sheffield will be more than enough to ensure you have no DPF issues and if you're doing such runs every week or two, I'd say a diesel is the perfect choice.
In fact, having had a loaner petrol for a few week (got rear-ended) I found the economy appalling. Was very happy to get my diesel back.
 

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I agree with the last post as I had no problems with my 2017MY DS in the five years I owned it from new but would you be happy to buy a car of that age with 73K miles, knowing what we know regarding cam chains snapping, balance shaft bearings failing, common DPF issues & oil dilution issues. Personally I wouldn’t touch one with a barge poll & certainly not from outside the main dealer network, its just too much of an unknown liability.
Depending on the extended warranty cost I also feel the same way about my P300e once it gets to three years old, love it at the moment but all that technology could lead to a nasty shock ! (pun intended ⚡) for example - new electric motor £10,000 a pop !
 

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I agree with the last post as I had no problems with my 2017MY DS in the five years I owned it from new but would you be happy to buy a car of that age with 73K miles, knowing what we know regarding cam chains snapping, balance shaft bearings failing, common DPF issues & oil dilution issues. Personally I wouldn’t touch one with a barge poll & certainly not from outside the main dealer network, its just too much of an unknown liability.
Depending on the extended warranty cost I also feel the same way about my P300e once it gets to three years old, love it at the moment but all that technology could lead to a nasty shock ! (pun intended ⚡) for example - new electric motor £10,000 a pop !
I fully understand your concerns. My view is that there are 2 ways to view the known issues. The first is that they're going to happen and if they haven't yet, you've dodged a bullet. Not my view personally. Mine is that the vast majority don't fail. So, if it's not gone by 73k, it's probably not going to.
Of course FSH is king. I'd want to look at not only the service schedule but also the mileage covered between oil changes (to identify those that may have run with oil dilution issues). Then take a view on whether it's a good bet.
I'd also agree, get one from a dealer if at all possible so you at least have 1 year of full warranty in case it is a basket case. If after a year it's trouble free, you're probably ok. Also bear in mind that a replacement (refurb) ingenium seems to run around £3k so not the end of the world if it does pack in. There's no way I'd be paying £15,000 to my local main dealer in such a circumstance.
On the new tech, it's one of the reasons I'm still reluctant to get a hybrid. I tend to buy 1 year old cars and keep them for 10 years. Over the next few years, firms will pop up that repair batteries, motors and the other complex stuff hybrids have but it's still early days. I always look back to the 80's when carburettors were on the way out and everyone said you could no longer risk having an older car as 'when' the ECU dies, they were so expensive to replace, the cars is as good as scrap. All that really happened was that a) they rarely failed and b) an industry sprung up repairing those that did. Nobody ever buys new ECUs and the same will happen with hybrid technology. It's only that it's just not quite there yet.
 
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