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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Just wanted to provide some additional information regarding the upcoming changes to vehicles to meet new regulations.

Land Rover is introducing Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology to all EU6b and NAS specification Land Rover diesel vehicles for 16MY.
This new technology enables Land Rover to meet the required regulations by reducing the levels of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emitted from the exhaust system by up to 90%.

How does the SCR technology work?
In addition to a new generation of catalytic converters, SCR technology requires the introduction of an additive into the diesel exhaust system. This high quality solution, made up of 32.5% high-purity urea and 67.5% deionised water, is drawn into the exhaust system of the vehicle from a reservoir, to reduce levels of NOx.

The additive is marketed as AdBlue® in Europe and Australia and Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) in North America. The product is well established for commercial vehicles and already in use with other passenger car manufacturers. The liquid is non-hazardous, however we do advise caution is used as it will stain trim, upholstery and clothing, therefore a controlled refill by a Land Rover authorised retailer or use of non-drip refill bottles is strongly recommended.

Low Level Warnings
Vehicles fitted with this system will provide a series of warnings in the vehicle's message centre to indicate a low DEF/AdBlue® level. At critically low levels,
this warning will display the remaining mileage before a no-start condition is imposed. The action that would prevent the engine from starting when the fluid reaches critical level cannot be changed as this is set by legislation and not directly by Land Rover.

If the fluid does run out this will result in failure to start until the reservoir is refilled with at least 3.6 litres of DEF/AdBlue®. It is therefore of utmost importance that customers are aware of the requirement to refill the DEF/AdBlue® reservoir as part of their ongoing vehicle maintenance.
Only DEF/AdBlue® manufactured to ISO22241-1 or DIN70070 should be used.

How Often Will DEF/AdBlue® Need Refilling?
We will provide the vehicle with the reservoir full at the time of production. The consumption of DEF/ AdBlue® is approximately 1 litre per 1,000 miles /1,600km for EU6 vehicles (North America 1.1 litre per 1,000km/621miles), this figure is influenced by many factors including driving style, engine size, and vehicle load.
Land Rover approved retailers will be able to provide assistance in refilling should this be required or alternatively, if you would prefer to self-fill you can purchase non-drip DEF/AdBlue® 1.89 litre refill bottles from your local authorised Land Rover retailer.

Availability
A 1.89 litre non-drip refill bottle is available for purchase, this will be supplied via your local Land Rover approved retailer. The part number is LR072258.

Other sources of supply
Please be advised to exercise caution regarding the use of fill options available at fuel stations. Commercial vehicle DEF/AdBlue® pumps cannot be used as the flow rate is too high and will damage the DEF/AdBlue® reservoir in the vehicle.
Bottled DEF/AdBlue® should be available from a number of third party sources, however we would advise caution using bottles without a non-drip interface to prevent spillage.

I hope this information is helpful and further information will be provided with vehicle equipped with this system at the time of purchase by your selling Land Rover approved retailer.

Many thanks,
Pete
 

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Hi Pete,

Thanks for the info - out of interest how much will the Refill bottles cost?

Thanks
 

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Hi deehamps,

German prices vary a great deal with the size of the unit you are buying. The 1.89l bottles beeing absurdly expensive at around 7€ per litre. With bigger units of 10 or 20 litres the price comes down to 1.50€ or even less in some cases.

There are special kits with hoses and non drip features available cheaply or included with the bigger packs.
So it looks like quite an extra hassle but th extra cost is actually pretty low if we shop smart.

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
deehamps said:
Hi Pete,

Thanks for the info - out of interest how much will the Refill bottles cost?

Thanks
Hi Deehamps,

As Martin has advised, there are some variations depending on how and where it is purchased.

The 1.89L refill bottles available from Land Rover approved retailers currently retails at approximately £7.50 (price correct as of 5/6/15)

Many thanks,
Pete
 

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Pete,

Can you advise/enquire how big the reservoir is in the MY16 DS ?
 

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Thanks for the quick response.

So Full reservoir will do 10K-14K miles, Certainly fine for me, i only do around 6K a year, and an "average" user should get a year.
 

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Hi Pete - dumb question but does the service plan include replacement of fluids such as this ? A £55 AdBlue fill up at service time isn't the end of the world but would be a bit of a kick in the teeth for being eco friendly .......
 

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I find it crazy that adding this one fluid suddenly fixes emissions on vehicles. Did make me wonder the feasibility of just adding it directly to the diesel in the first place if it's just mixing with it anyway?

I'm assuming all manufacturers diesel vehicles will have this by the end of the year?
 

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It's basically refined wee isn't it? I suppose if you run out in the middle of no-where there's a potential solution :)

Good to know it's a service item and that its included in the plan.
 

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DiscoDiscoman - Ad blue isn't added directly to the diesel fuel. It is precisely metered and sprayed into the hot exhaust manifold where the urea solution breaks-down into ammonia and reacts with the exhaust gasses in the presence of a catalytic converter. The oxides of nitrogen formed at combustion are converted into harmless nitrogen and water.
 

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Just out of interest, why does it matter that the filler is "non-drip"? It doesn't sound like it's highly toxic or corrosive or anything? Can't you just use a funnel and / or flush any spillage down at once?
 

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No doubt it's better not to drip but the OP implies the world will end if you DO drip,
 

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Talking to a number of guys who have used the stuff for a number of years on lorries and coaches, they claim you do not want to spill the stuff as it discolours most items it lands on.
 

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Moose said:
Talking to a number of guys who have used the stuff for a number of years on lorries and coaches, they claim you do not want to spill the stuff as it discolours most items it lands on.
Tx. So my idea would be to design it so the filling nozzle was no-where near anything you would care if it discoloured. Still, it's nice to know WHY when they tell you these rules.
 

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@Pete,
Do you allow to publish your report in an German forum?
 
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